Category: Students

School Nutrition Matters. Here’s How Our Schools Can Do Better.

The reason we still serve hot lunch in school cafeterias is because districts nationwide recognize that well-nourished kids are better equipped to learn. The science is simple. Glucose—also known as blood sugar—is the brain’s basic fuel. Consistent and balanced meals help students do all sorts of academic tasks, like concentrate, listen and keep behavior in check, according to registered dietitian…

Students Use Trust and Empathy to Extinguish Flames Sparked by Racially Charged Controversy

The op-ed below was originally published by The Denver Post as “After racially charged dispute, Manual and Weld Central Students heal division together.” We are both encouraged and inspired by the words of Manual High School senior, Ani Vasquez, and admire the students at Manual High School and Weld Central High School for leading their school communities toward understanding and…

When it comes to online courses, trust me. It’s nothing personal.

Online courses that claim to offer personalized learning experiences are ineffective unless you add a little common sense.   Students cannot meet course goals unless relationships are established between the student and the online instructor. Online courses should provide flexible interaction with the instructor. Another essential is purposeful and immediate feedback. It is vital for the student, to know how…

Building agile schools in the age of agility

By Maureen Kelleher and Chyrise Harris The key three factors most likely to change the nature of future work are: artificial intelligence/robots, demographic changes and concentration of talent in certain locations, according to a new study from America Succeeds. It’s a good guess that lots of the jobs people currently hold will be drastically changed or eliminated. Estimates of how…

Banning “To Kill a Mockingbird” wouldn’t have stopped the boy down the street from using the N-word

I’ll never forget the morning I left my house to go to school, only to see the N-word written in chalk along my walk to the bus stop. Ironically, it wasn’t the first time that week I’d seen the word, as my English class had been reading “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Harper Lee’s exploration of civil rights and racism in…